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Mediterranean diet may help reduce bone loss: Study

11 days ago  
News / Tribune/ Health  
LONDON: Eating a Mediterranean-type diet - rich in fruit, vegetables, nuts, unrefined cereals, olive oil, and fish - could reduce bone loss in people with osteoporosis, a study claims. The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, is the first long-term, pan-European clinical trial looking at the impact of a Mediterranean diet on bone health in older adults. "This is a particularly sensitive area for osteoporosis as loss of bone in the femoral neck is often the cause of hip fracture, which is common in elderly people with osteoporosis," said Susan Fairweather-Tait, a professor at the University of East Anglia in the UK. More than 1,000 people aged between 65 and 79 took part in the trial, and volunteers were randomised into two groups - one which followed a Mediterranean diet and a control group which did not. Bone density was measured at the start and after 12 months. The diet had no discernible impact on participants with normal bone density, but i..
                 

'Teens drinking regularly face worse alcohol problems than adults'

11 days ago  
News / Tribune/ Health  
SYDNEY: Teens aged under 17 who drink alcohol weekly are three times more likely to binge drink and be dependent on alcohol as adults compared with their peers who don't drink, an Australian-led research said on Wednesday. "The study further debunks the myth that teen experimentation with alcohol promotes responsible drinking, instead it sets a young person up for later-life drinking problem," Xinhua news agency quoted Professor George Patton from the Murdoch Children's Research Institute as saying. The researchers looked at the drinking patterns of 9,000 adolescents in Australia and New Zealand. The findings suggest that delaying drinking alcohol would have "significant public health benefits" as well as showing that public health messages "need to focus as much on frequency of drinking as the amount consumed", said lead author Edmund Silins. "Discouraging or delaying alcohol use in adolescence is likely to have substantial benefits in adulthood..
                 

Living without AC can lower students’ cognitive abilities

11 days ago  
News / Tribune/ Health  
Boston, July 11 Living in dormitories without air-conditioning (AC) during a heat wave can lower students’ ability to focus, harm their working memory and increase reaction times, a Harvard study has found. The field study, the first to demonstrate the detrimental cognitive effects of indoor temperatures during a heat wave in a group of young healthy individuals, highlights the need for sustainable design solutions in mitigating the health impacts of extreme heat. “Most of the research on the health effects of heat has been done in vulnerable populations, such as the elderly, creating the perception that the general population is not at risk from heat waves,” said Jose Guillermo Cedeno-Laurent, research fellow at Harvard University in the US. “To address this blind spot, we studied healthy students living in dorms as a natural intervention during a heat wave in Boston,” said Cedeno-Laurent, lead author of the study published in the journal PLOS Medicin..
                 

Better eye-to-hand coordination could make kids smarter

11 days ago  
News / Tribune/ Health  
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Spending time outside may boost your health: Study

13 days ago  
News / Tribune/ Health  
LONDON: Living close to nature and spending time outside may reduce the risk of type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, premature death, preterm birth, and stress, a study claims. According to the research involving data from over 290 million people from 20 countries, populations with higher levels of greenspace exposure are more likely to report good overall health. "Spending time in nature certainly makes us feel healthier, but until now the impact on our long-term wellbeing has not been fully understood," said Caoimhe Twohig-Bennett from the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the UK. "We gathered evidence from over 140 studies involving more than 290 million people to see whether nature really does provide a health boost," said Twohig-Bennett, lead author of the study published in the journal Environmental Research. The team analysed how the health of people with little access to green spaces compared to that of people with the highest amounts of expo..